Safran Publishers
 
Home » By Authors » D » de Callatai, Godefroid
 
Plato Ikhwanianus. Retour sur le récit platonicien de l'anneau de Gygès dans l'encyclopédie des Frères de la Pureté
= Paper =
 
In the 52nd and last epistle of the Brethren of Purity, one finds a passage which is a very faithful translation of Plato’s famous narrative about the ring of Gyges. Taking into account the literality of the translation, the size of the passage (about 30 lines) and the precision of the reference made to the original text, it may fairly be assumed that it is a unicum in the history of the transmission of Plato to the Arab world. The purpose of this paper is to take up again this issue and try to bring up some new elements to the discussion.
 

 

9,50 €
Les douze grands dieux de l’Énéide
= Paper =
 
By the time when Vergil wrote the Aeneid, the number and identification of the Olympian Gods had long been determined. The Gods were twelve in number, collectively known as “dodekatheoi”, and their names, in Latin, were: Apollo, Ceres, Diana, Iuno, Iuppiter, Mars, Mercurius, Minerva, Neptunus, Venus, Vesta and Vulcanus. Yet it may be safely assumed that no order or, as it were, logical sequence, was ever imposed for the group as a whole, so that any artist or writer in Antiquity remained free to represent or describe them in the order of his choice. This article focuses on the question of the Twelve Olympians in the Aeneid. It puts forward a method whose purpose is to examine whether each book of the poem may be said to be dominated by one particular Olympian god. This investigation comes as a complement of previous studies already published about the literary architecture of the Aeneid.
 
9,50 €